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Home > The Medieval Period > The Medieval Period
A very rare and largely complete Medieval leather shoe from Queenshithe, River Thames, London. Recorded and conserved by the Museum of London. SOLD
A very rare and largely complete Medieval leather shoe from Queenshithe, River Thames, London. Recorded and conserved by the Museum of London. SOLD
A very rare and largely complete Medieval leather shoe from Queenshithe, River Thames, London. Recorded and conserved by the Museum of London. SOLD A very rare and largely complete Medieval leather shoe from Queenshithe, River Thames, London. Recorded and conserved by the Museum of London. SOLD A very rare and largely complete Medieval leather shoe from Queenshithe, River Thames, London. Recorded and conserved by the Museum of London. SOLD A very rare and largely complete Medieval leather shoe from Queenshithe, River Thames, London. Recorded and conserved by the Museum of London. SOLD
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SOLD

c.1350-1400 A.D. A very rare and largely complete Medieval leather shoe found in the 1990's at Queenshithe on the River Thames and was recorded and professionally conserved by the Museum of London. The leather has been specially dryed out and impregnated with a special wax to help preserve the ancient leather. The shoe has been filled with a special tissue paper by the conservators to help support the shoes overall shape and it still shows clearly all original detail including the original lace holes on the side opening. Part of the sole is missing under the heel and there are a few minor splits as you would expect but otherwise it is largely intact and in good overall condition for ancient leather. A very rare, seldom encountered (or offered) artefact and certainly a good conversation piece. [It is fascinating to imagine the London that this shoe walked around more than 600 years ago and the stories it could tell], shoe measures approximately 215mm long x 73mm at widest x 110mm (when being worn it may have been slightly larger as ancient leather can shrink a little when dryed and conserved).


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